DIP RESEARCH

SPOR – DIABETES AND ITS RELATED COMPLCATIONS

 

The FNHSSM - Diabetes Integration Project lead by Dr. Barry Lavallee, has partnered with the University of Toronto on the Canadian Institutes for Health Research on a grant entitled, “Strategies for Patient Oriented Research (SPOR) – Diabetes and Its Related complications.

 

By 2020, over 10% of Canadians (3M) will have diabetes. Type 1 and 2 diabetes are a major cause of vision loss, amputations, heart and kidney failure. There is an urgent need to establish effective patient centred, evidence based and primary care focused models of early detection and targeted interventions to prevent and better manage diabetes complications.

 

The SPOR Diabetes Network has partnered with a number of academic researchers across Canada in the following areas:

 

  1. Recognizing Risk for all diabetes complications and customizing interventions

    • Launching of diabetes complications screening pilot studies

    • Development of a comprehensive diabetes registry for communities screened

    • Design a diabetes complications “Risk Calculator”

  2. Biological Risk Analysis – comparison of clients with low and high risk complications

    • Discovery of an application of new biomarkers to detect risk before clinical signs develop

  3. Precision Tools – Empowering clients to achieve diabetes management using insulin pumps and/or external pancreas

    • Use of technology assisted prevention of diabetes complications

  4. Targeted Interventions – diet, lifestyle, and physical activity

 

DIP will be involved in one of the many projects through the SPOR Network. Principle investigator is Dr. Barry Lavallee through the University of Manitoba, in a joint application to the Canadian Institutes for Health Research (CIHR).

 

The Diabetes Integration Project will be involved in the development of a “National Training in Culturally Safe Diabetes Education” project.

 

The project will be jointly funded by the SPOR Network and Research Manitoba for a total of $575K ($115/YR X 5 Years). $287,500 from the SPOR Network and $287,500 from Research Manitoba

SPOR CAN-SOLVE CKD - OPTIMAL APPROACHES TO CKD CASE FINDING IN INDIGENOUS COMMUNITIES

 

The First Nations Community Based Screening to Improve Kidney Health and Prevent Dialysis (FINISHED) Project ran in 11 Manitoba First Nations communities from 2012-2015 as an active Screen, Triage and Treat model for chronic kidney disease (CKD), hypertension and diabetes. The FINISHED Project led to the successful 5 year Strategies for Patient Oriented Research (SPOR) proposal entitled, “CAN-SOLVE CKD - OPTIMAL APPROACHES TO CKD CASE FINDING IN INDIGENOUS COMMUNITIES co-lead by Dr. Adeera Levin, University of British Columbia and Dr. Paul Komenda, Manitoba Renal Program.

 

Currently supported by The Aboriginal Diabetes Initiative (First Nations Inuit Health Branch) to provide culturally safe care and screening for diabetes related complications to Indigenous people in Manitoba. Through a joint initiative across British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Northwestern Ontario, the plan is to expand and train primary care providers across Canada on this successful model of culturally safe, community-based care for Indigenous and non-Indigenous persons living with diabetes.

 

The Diabetes Integration Project will lead the training and capacity development activities of screening, triage and treatment activities of Renal Screening Teams across the country. The DIP provides a culturally safe and appropriate model for research to use in overcoming the barriers to comprehensive, coordinated and integrated intervention for limb, eye, cardiovascular and kidney complications.

(I-KHEALTH) IMPROVING RESPONSIVENESS ACROSS THE CONTINUUM OF KIDNEY HEALTH CARE IN RURAL AND REMOTE MANITOBA FIRST NATION COMMUNITIES (I-KHEALTH)

"Improving responsiveness across the continuum of kidney health care in rural and remote Manitoba First Nation communities (I-KHealth) builds on the success of the FINISHED project with a partnership-based program of research which brings together community-based researchers from the FNHSSM/Diabetes Integration Project, First Nation patients with lived experience of kidney disease, University of Manitoba (UM) university-based researchers and the Manitoba Renal Program. The project will receive $1.5 million over 5 years in funding from the federal government’s Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

 

The project has four components including:

  • Mapping patient journeys for First Nations people living in rural and remote areas

  • Assessing primary health care’s role in kidney health

  • Evaluating and developing appropriate kidney health education

  • Exploring alternative models of dialysis treatment delivery.

 

While a diagnosis of kidney disease is life-changing, a diagnosis in an earlier stage of chronic kidney disease (CKD) can lead to interventions that help manage the disease and reduce the possibility of progressing to later stages and the need for dialysis.

TYPE 2 DIABETES IN MANITOBA

In June 2015, the Provincial Minister of Health approved three research deliverables (TB, Diabetes in Manitoba and the First Nations Atlas Update). The Minister requested that FNHSSM be collaborators on the project. This project will link the Indian Registry file with the MB Health databases.

 

The Diabetes in Manitoba deliverable would provide an analysis of major trends in type 2 diabetes trends, prevalence, incidence, complications and mortality in Manitoba from 1979 – 2015. It would include the following:

  • Health service use

  • Physician visits

  • Hospitalization

  • Prescription drug use

  • Changes over time, income quintiles and regions of the province

  • Early onset of type 2 diabetes

  • Diabetes in Pregnancy

 

The Final Report is expected to be completed in the fall of 2019.

DIP RESEARCH ARTICLES

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